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Lesson plan

Lesson 8: Choosing the Right Resource

teaches Common Core State Standards W.5.8 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/5/8
teaches Common Core State Standards W.5.9 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/5/9
teaches Common Core State Standards W.5.7 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/5/7
teaches Common Core State Standards W.4.8 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/4/8
teaches Common Core State Standards W.4.9 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/4/9
teaches Common Core State Standards W.4.7 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/4/7
teaches Common Core State Standards W.3.8 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/3/8
teaches Common Core State Standards W.3.7 http://corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/3/7

Lesson 8: Choosing the Right Resource

In this lesson, students will learn how to use three of the student-friendly resources on the DCPL website.  It references items and research topics from the 3rd-grade inquiry arc, Who Changes D.C.?

 

Prepare in Advance:

  • Have your DC Public Library card number ready to access lesson materials throughout the lesson.

DC Content Power Standards:

  • 3.4.5: Identify and research outstanding statements of moral and civic principles made in Washington, D.C., as well as the leaders who delivered them, that contributed to the struggle to extend equal rights to all Americans (e.g., Lincoln and his second inaugural address, Frederick Douglass and his speech against lynching at the Metropolitan AME Church, Martin Luther King Jr. and his speeches at the Lincoln Memorial in 1957 and 1963, and Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales at the Poor People’s March).
  • 4.7.7: Explain various reasons why people came to the colonies, including how both whites from Europe and blacks from Africa came to America as indentured servants who were released at the end of their indenture.
  • 5.4.7:  Students identify prominent people and movements for social justice in the United Stated including: Frederick Douglass, the Grimke sisters, and William Lloyd Garrison and the abolishment of slavery.
  • 5.14.3: Identify key leaders in the struggle to extend equal rights to all Americans through the decades (e.g., Mary McLeod Bethune, Ella Jo Baker, César Chávez, Frederick Douglass, Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales, Charles Houston, Martin Luther King Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Carlos Montes, Baker Motley, Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Reies López Tijerina).