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Lesson Plan

Understand the significance of the y-intercept by comapring proportional (y = mx) and non-proportional (y=mx + b) relationships

teaches Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Practice.MP1 http://corestandards.org/Math/Practice/MP1
teaches Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Content.8.F.A.3 http://corestandards.org/Math/Content/8/F/A/3
teaches Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Practice.MP3 http://corestandards.org/Math/Practice/MP3
teaches Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Practice.MP4 http://corestandards.org/Math/Practice/MP4
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Big Ideas: If a function is nonlinear, then it is non-proportional. Linear functions can represent proportional or non-proportional relationships. Proportional relationships (y=mx) have defining characteristics that can be visualized in multiple representations of functions. Non-proportional relationships (y=mx + b) have defining characteristics that can be visualized in multiple representations of functions. This task builds on students’ prior work with proportional relationships in the form y=mx. (7.RP.2). It extends students’ understanding that functions are a means to make sense of real-world situations and that functions can be represented in multiple representations (8.F.1). In this task, students have opportunities to apply multiple representations of functions to determine the role of the y-intercept in understanding and identifying proportional and non-proportional relationships. It builds a foundation for students’ work with transformations of functions. Vocabulary: proportional, non-proportional, direct variation, slope, y-intercept, linear function Special Materials: Task Cards (Supplemental Handout)
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