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Common Core: W.3.1

Lessonset 3rd grade argumentative writing: opinion essay (1)

Brainstorm, plan, and write an argumentative essay in the third grade.
  1. Identify and describe opinion writing

    Identify and describe opinion writing

    Common Core: W.3.1 | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson you will learn how to identify and describe opinion writing by finding words that show strong feelings, a clear opinion statement, and supporting reasons.

  2. Brainstorm topics for an argumentative essay

    Brainstorm topics for an argumentative essay

    Common Core: W.3.1 | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson you will brainstorm opinion topics by listing things that you care about, and that give you strong feelings.

  3. Develop a thesis statement

    Develop a thesis statement

    Common Core: W.3.1 | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson, you will learn how to develop a thesis statement by checking to make sure you have strong reasons to support it.

  4. Draft body paragraphs with real life examples

    Draft body paragraphs with real life examples

    Common Core: W.3.1b | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson, you will learn how to draft body paragraphs by stretching out your reasons with examples from your life.

  5. Connect ideas and examples in argumentative writing

    Connect ideas and examples in argumentative writing

    Common Core: W.3.1c | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson, you will learn how to make your paragraphs flow by connecting your examples to your opinion.

  6. Draft an introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay

    Draft an introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay

    Common Core: W.3.1a | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson, you will learn how to pull in your reader by posing a question or making a bold statement.

  7. Draft a conclusion paragraph for an opinion essay

    Draft a conclusion paragraph for an opinion essay

    Common Core: W.3.1d | by: Rebecca Hipps

    In this lesson, you will learn to draft a conclusion that will leave your reader thinking by restating your thesis and giving a plea for action.